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LLAMA

LUSTRE WITHOUT FRIZZ

The llama is a South American camelid. It produces an outer coat of ordinary wool fibres which are straight, rough and non-elastic, with a fine, crinkly undercoat. The fibre is characterised by its lustre and lack of frizziness. 

Llama fibres are generally thicker than those of other camelids but with an appropriate selection process they can produce fine and soft wool. In the textile industry, llama fibre is used either pure or in blends for the production of fabrics for jackets, coats and knitwear.

 

LAMBSWOOL

UNPARALLELED SOFTNESS

Lambswool is pure virgin wool from the first shearing of lambs. It is an extremely fine and soft wool which retains warmth and absorbs moistureIts softness and suppleness means it is ideal for fabrics and knitwearLambswool fabrics can be of various types, from Melton to Beaver, lightweight to heavy.

 

LINEN

 

SHEEN, FRESHNESS, BREATHABILITY

Linen is a cellulose fibre made from the stem of flax plant, Linum Usitatissimum, which is grown in Europe, North Africa, India and the Americas. Linen fibres come from the inner bark of the plant. To extract them, the dried stems are macerated for several days in vats of water or steamed. The raw linen is obtained by the processes of scutching and combing to separate the long fibres from the short ones. Linen consists of approximately 70% celluloseUnder the microscope, each individual fibre displays evenly-spaced horizontal rings. The fibre is polygonal and shiny, with a cool, slippery texture. It swells slightly in the presence of moisture. Linen is classified according to the fineness of the fibres. Linen is used to make fine yarns suitable for the production of high-quality fabrics such as lace and crochetLinen fabrics are also used for household items and summer clothing for men and women.